AP Chemistry 2016-2017

Week of April 24

All week: students will work on AP practice questions and practice tests

Week of April 9

Wednesday

Finish chapter 21. cover batteries, corrosion, electrolysis.

Thursday

Test on chapter 21

Week of April 3

Monday/Wednesday
Objective: students will be able to
1. balance redox equations (review)
2. define the components of an electrochemical cell
3. distinguish between a galvanic and electrolytic cell
4. define cell potentials
5. use line notation to describe electrochemical cells.
Procedure: cover sections 21.1-21.2.  Distribute problem set to follow during class.
Homework: pp. 967-968, 10-13, 22-34, due Wednesday.

Thursday/Friday
Objectives: students will be able to
1. predict relative strengths of oxidizing and reducing agents
2. predict if a cell reaction is spontaneous
3. calculate equilibrium constants from cell potentials
4. state the dependence of cell potential on concentration (Nernst equation)
5. solve problems using these concepts.
6. describe the composition of common batteries and explain their operation
7. explain corrosion
Procedure:  cover sections 21.3 - 21.6. 

Week of March 27

Mostly PARCC

Thursday

Finish chapter 20

Friday

Quizzinger on chapter 20

Week of March 20

Tuesday

Test on chapter 19.Start chapter 20, see objectives below.

Wednesday/Thursday

Objective: students will be able to
1. define spontaneous process
2. define entropy
3. state the second law of thermodynamics
4. define free energy
5. predict spontaneity of chemical reactions based on DS and DH
6. state the third law of thermodynamics
Procedure: cover sections 20.1-20.2.
Homework:  pp. 887-889, 11, 15, 17, 23, 34, 36, 51, 57, 69, 86

Week of March 13

Tuesday/Wednesday
Objectives: students will be able to
1. calculate Ksp given solubility
2. calculate solubilities from Ksp
3. calculate effect of common ions on solubility
4. effect of pH on solubility
Procedure: cover section 19.3, review for a test on Friday
Demo: show precipitation of sodium chloride from water by adding common ion, Cl- from concentrated hydrochloric acid.
Homework: p. 871, 68-75 due Wednesday

Thursday

Test on chapter 19.

Week of March 6

Monday

Objectives: students will be able to describe titrations (weak acid/strong base, weak base/strong acid), solve titration problems, describe pH curves of monoprotic and polyprotic acids, determine equivalence points, determine applicability of acid-base indicators.
Procedure: cover section 19.2.

Wednesday

Objectives: students will be able to determine by titration the molarity of a sodium hydroxide solution, determine the molar mass of an unknown acid.
Procedure: students will perform Acid/Base Titration, experiment 15-2 in Chemistry Concepts and Applications. Students will use a pH meter for the second part of the lab, allowing them to calculate the acid dissociation constant, Ka, of the unknown acid.

Thursday

See Monday's lesson. Also students will make a buffer solution if time allows.

Friday

Students will graph data from Wednesday's lab, work on lab reports.

Week of February 27

Monday

Finish chapter 18, review

Tuesday

Test on chapter 18

Thursday/Friday

Objectives: students will be able to
1. describe and use the common ion effect
2. define a buffer
3. calculate the pH of a buffered solution
Procedure: cover section 19.1.
Homework: pg. 869, 11,12,15,16,23,24,27,28,31,32, due Monday.

Week of February 20

Tuesday/Wednesday
Objectives: students will be able to
1. distinguish between Arrhenius vs. Brønsted-Lowry models
2. define conjugate acid, conjugate base
3. define acid strength by Ka
4. define amphoteric nature of water, pH scale
Procedure: continue with chapter 18 on acids and bases, cover sections 18.2 - 18.3.
Homework, due Friday: pp. 798-799, 42, 44, 48, 56, 64, 66, 68, 70, 87, 91, 95, 99

Friday
Objective: students will be able to
1. calculate pH and pOH of strong acid and strong base solutions
2. calculate pH of weak acid solutions including polyprotic acids
3. calculate pH of weak base solutions

4. calculate pH of acidic and basic salt solutions.
Procedure: Cover sections to achieve above objectives.

Study for a quiz on chapter 18 on Monday

Week of February 13

Monday
Objectives: students will be able to
1. solve for equilibrium concentrations given equilibrium constant
2. define and apply LeChâtelier's principle.
Procedure: cover sections 17.5-17.6, distribute and work on practice problems.

Homework: pp. 769-770, 14-19, 28-30, 35-36, 42-46 Due Tuesday for review.

Tusday

Finish chapter 17 and review for a quizzang on Wednesday.

Wednesday

Quizzang on chapter 17

Friday

Objectives: students will be able to
1. distinguish between weak and strong acids
2. distinguish between Arrhenius vs. Brønsted-Lowry models
3. define conjugate acid, conjugate base
4. define acid strength by Ka
5. define amphoteric nature of water, pH scale
6. calculate pH of strong and weak acid solutions.
Procedure: start chapter 18 on acids and bases.cover sections 18.1 - 18.3.
Demo: show acid/base equilibria using mixtures of strong and weak acids and bases in the presence of universal indicator, show properties of acids, bases.

Week of February 6

Monday

Review, then test on chapter 16.

Tuesday/Wednesday

Objectives: students will be able to
1. define chemical equilibrium
2. define equilibrium constant
3. relate reaction quotient and equilibrium constant
4. write reaction quotients for various reactions
5. compare Kc and Kp and convert from one to the other
6. solve problems involving equilibrium by writing expressions for Keq, Kp
Procedure: Start chapter 17 on chemical equilibrium. Cover sections 17.1-17.3.
Begin equilibrium problem solving, section 17.4. Distribute sample problem sheet including table to aid in the organization of this type of problem solving. Return and review test on chapter 16,
Homework: TBA

Friday

Objectives: students will be able to
1. solve for equilibrium concentrations given equilibrium constant
2. define and apply LeChâtelier's principle.
Procedure: cover sections 17.5-17.6, distribute and work on practice problems.

Week of January 30

Tuesday/Wednesday

Objectives: students will be able to
1. discuss the temperature dependence of reaction rates
2. describe the collision model
3. define catalysis
4. compare homogeneous vs. heterogeneous catalysis
5. discuss catalysis mechanisms and examples.
Procedures: cover sections on the kinetics model, on catalysis. Go to computer lab to graph in Excel, for kinetics lab.

Wednesday/Thursday

Objectives: students will be able to
1. define catalysis
2. compare homogeneous vs. heterogeneous catalysis
3. discuss catalysis mechanisms and examples.
Procedures: finish discussion on reaction mechanisms, by reviewing the AP test questions, cover section on the kinetics model, on catalysis.

Week on January 23

Monday

1. define rate law

2. determine reaction order of individual reactants

3. determine reaction order of overall reaction order by interpretation of graphical data.
Procedure: Continue with chapter 16 on Chemical Kinetics, cover sections 16-2 to 16.3.

Wednesday

Objectives: Students will be able to

Procedure: students will perform a lab on reaction kinetics.

Thursday/Friday

Objectives: students will be able to
1. determine reaction order of individual reactants
2. determine reaction order of overall reaction order by interpretation of graphical data.
3. use the integrated rate law to determine the form of a rate expression
4. define half-life of second order and zero order reactions

Procedure: Continue with chapter 16 on Chemical Kinetics, cover sections 16-3 to 16-4.

Week of January 16

Tuesday

Finish organic nomenclature. Define isomers. Review for a test on covered sections of chapters 12, 13 and 15.

Wednesday

Interparticle Forces lab report due.

Thursday

Test on chapters 12, 13 and 15. Then start chapter 16, see below.

Objectives: students will be able to
1. define reaction rate
2. describe factors that influence reaction rate
3. distinguish between average, instantaneous and initial rates
4. interpret a graph of concentration vs. time
Procedure: Begin chapter 16 on Chemical Kinetics, cover appropriate sections in Silberberg.Start chapter 16 on reaction kinetics.

Friday

1. define rate law

2. determine reaction order of individual reactants

3. determine reaction order of overall reaction order by interpretation of graphical data.
Procedure: Continue with chapter 16 on Chemical Kinetics, cover sections 16-2 to 16.3.

Week of January 9

Monday

Objectives: students will be able to
1. describe structure, properties and bonding in the solid state
2. desribe doping and explain the function of a p/n junction

Procedure: cover sections 12.4-12.7 to meet above objectives.
Demos: use models to show bonding in solids.

Tuesday

Objectives: students will be able to
1. define solubility, solute, solvent
2. discuss factors affecting solubility (pressure, temperature)
3. calculate solution concentrations in mass percent, mole fraction, molality
Procedure: cover sections in chapter 13 to meet above objectives.

Thursday/Friday

Objectives: students will be able to
1. define and name alkanes, alkenes, alkynes
2. define isomerism in these compounds
3. discuss stereoisomers, give examples
4. find and name isomers of a given hydrocarbon
Procedure: begin chapter 15 on carbon, distribute nomentclature rules, cover pages in the text to cover the objective topics.
Demos: show examples of gaseous, liquid and solid alkanes

Week of January 1

Tuesday/Wedneday
Objectives: students will be able to
1. Use the Clausius-Clapeyron equation to calculate temperature as a function of vapor pressure
2. define types of interparticle forces
3. describe effects of molecular shape on boiling point

Procedure: Reading Quiz on Chapter 12, cover sections 12.1-12.3 to meet above objectives. Distribute practice sheet for guided practice.

Homework: TBA

Thursday/Friday
Objectives: students will be able to
1. Describe properties of the liquid state
2. describe structure, properties and bonding in the solid state
3. desribe doping and explain the function of a p/n junction

Procedure: cover sections 12.4-12.7 to meet above objectives.
Demos: show capillarity apparatus, float a paper clip on water, viscosity of sugar syrup

 

Week of December 19

Monday/Tuesday

Objectives: students will be able to
1. describe hybridization of orbitals as sp, sp2, sp3, dsp3 or d2sp3
2. describe valence bond and MO theory and give examples
Procedure: cover sections in chapter 11 on bonding to meet above objectives.
Demo: show models of methane, ethane, ethene and ethyne showing geometry of sigma and pi bonds.

Wednesday

Test on chapters 9, 10 and 11

Friday

Peace Corps pictures

 

Week of December 12

Lewis structures and VSEPR.

Week of December 5

Monday

Test on chapters 7 and 8.

Wednesday/Thursday

Objectives: students will be able to
1. describe ionic vs. covalent bonding
2. explain an energy vs. internuclear distance diagram in terms of atomic attractions and repulsions
3. calculate lattice energy
4. use lattice energy to explain the formation of various ionic solids
5. compare bond energy and bond length in covalent compounds
6. apply bond energy concepts to IR spectroscopy
Procedure: Begin chapter 9 on bonding, cover sections in the text to meet above objectives.

Homework TBA

Friday

Objective: students will be able to
1. explain and use the concepts of bond energies to calculate energies of reaction

2. use electronegativity to predict bond polarity

3. draw Lewis structures, including exceptions to the octet rule

Procedure: continue with chapter 9, start chapter 10

Week of November 28

Monday

Lab reports due.

Objectives: students will be able to
1. explain the splitting of energy levels in polyelectronic atoms using the penetration effect
2. draw electron configurations of atoms and ions using the Aufbau principle and Hund’s rule
3. define and predict these trends using the periodic table:
a) atomic radius
b) ionization energy
c) electron affinity
d) metallic behavior

Tuesday

Objectives: students will be able to define and predict these trends using the periodic table:
a) atomic radius
b) ionization energy
c) electron affinity
d) metallic behavior
Procedure: finish chapter 8, distribute practice questions.
Homework: study for a test on chapters 7 and 8.

Thursday

Test on chapters 7 and 8.

Start chapter 9 on bonding, see Friday's plans.

Friday

Objectives: students will be able to
1. describe ionic vs. covalent bonding
2. explain an energy vs. internuclear distance diagram in terms of atomic attractions and repulsions
3. calculate lattice energy
4. use lattice energy to explain the formation of various ionic solids
5. compare bond energy and bond length in covalent compounds
6. apply bond energy concepts to IR spectroscopy
Procedure: Begin chapter 9 on bonding, cover sections in the text to meet above objectives.

Homework: TBA

Week of November 21

Monday

Objective: students will be able to
1. calculate DeBroglie wavelengths,
2. define these terms: node, orbital, wave function, probability distribution, degenerate energy levels, uncertainty principle
3. explain and use quantum numbers to assign energy level, sublevel, electron spin to various atoms
Procedure: finish chapter 7, discuss topics to cover above objectives. Distribute problem set for guided practice and comprehension.

Wednesday

Objectives: students will be able to
1. explain the splitting of energy levels in polyelectronic atoms using the penetration effect
2. draw electron configurations of atoms and ions using the Aufbau principle and Hund’s rule
3. define and predict these trends using the periodic table:
a) atomic radius
b) ionization energy
c) electron affinity
d) metallic behavior

Thursday and Friday

No school

Week of November 14

Monday/Tuesday
Objective: students will be able to
1. define the wave nature of matter
2. solve problems using the relationships between energy, wavelength, frequency and mass
3. discuss the developments in physics/chemistry at the turn of the last century (photoelectric effect, Planck’s observations of incandescent solids) which lead to the development of quantum theory
4. calculate DeBroglie wavelengths
5. state the relationship between wavelength, frequency and speed of EM radiation
6. calculate energy of electrons between different energy levels of the hydrogen atom using the Bohr model of the atom.
Procedure: start chapter 7, discuss topics to cover above objectives. Distribute problem set for guided practice and comprehension.
Homework: TBA

Thursday

Objectives: students will be able to
1. prepare cobalt solutions of various concentrations
2. use the Spec 20 spectrometer
3. identify the concentration of a cobalt solutions of unknown concentration
4. state and use Beer’s Law
5. work cooperatively in groups
Procedure: students will perform a spectroscopy lab.

Friday

Objective: students will be able to
1. calculate DeBroglie wavelengths,
2. define these terms: node, orbital, wave function, probability distribution, degenerate energy levels, uncertainty principle
3. explain and use quantum numbers to assign energy level, sublevel, electron spin to various atoms
Procedure: continue with chapter 7, discuss topics to cover above objectives. Distribute problem set for guided practice and comprehension.

 

Week of November 7

Wednesday

Objective: students will be able to
1. define the wave nature of matter
2. solve problems using the relationships between energy, wavelength, frequency and mass

Procedure: quiz on chapter 6, then start chapter 7 to meet objectives above. A short lab will be performed to illustrate atomic spectra.

Week of October 31

Monday

Objectives: students will be able to
1. solve problems on calorimetry

2. state Hess’s Law

Procedure:
Procedure: continue with chapter 6, cover calorimetry, derivation of the definition of enthalpy.

Wednesday

Objectives: students will be able to
1. solve problems on calorimetry

2. state Hess’s Law

3. measure heat of reaction of Mg in HCl, determine heat of formation of Mg2+(aq) from Mg(s). (One period of double lab period)

Procedure:
Procedure: Continue with chapter 6, cover calorimetry, derivation of the definition of enthalpy, Hess’s Law, model problems using Hess’s Law. Students will perform lab 20-2 in Chemistry Concepts and Applications.
Homework: pp. 280-281, 3, 7, 10, 11, 17, 18, 19, 22, 23, 41, 42, 45, 46

Thursday

Objective: students will be able to
1. solve problems on standard enthalpies of formation
2. write reactions of formation with reactants, products in standard states.
Procedure: cover standard enthalpies of formation, standard states, model problems on these concepts. Review.

Friday

Quiz on chapter 6.

Week of October 24

Monday

Objectives: students will be able to
1. state and use Dalton's law of partial pressures
2. derive the formula for the density of an ideal gas.

3. define the meaning of Kelvin Temperature in terms of average kinetic energy of gas particles
4. derive the expression for root mean squared velocity.
5. distinguish between effusion and diffusion

6. State the kinetic molecular theory.
Procedure: discuss objective topics, assign problems to solve in class.
Homework: pp. 243-245, 42, 45, 46, 48, 49, 53, 54, 57, 58, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79, 80, due Thursday for review.

Wednesday

Objectives: students will be able to
1. Derive Graham’s Law, solve problems
2. compare real vs. ideal gases
3. review homework
Procedure: discuss objective topics, assign problems to solve in class.
Demo: molecular race.

Homework: study for a test on chapter 5, gases.

Thursday

Test on Chapter 5, gases.

Friday

Objectives: students will be able to

  1. solve problems on calorimetry
  2. state Hess’s Law

Procedure:
Procedure: Start chapter 6, cover calorimetry, derivation of the definition of enthalpy. Show steam engine, example of energy transformation.

Week of October 17

Monday (double)

Lab: Determination of R, the gas constant

Tuesday

Objectives: students will be able to
1. state Avogadro’s Law
2. solve problems using gas laws
3. state and use Dalton's law of partial pressures
4. derive the formula for the density of an ideal gas.
Procedure: discuss objective topics, assign problems to solve in class.

Wednesday

Objectives: students will be able to

Procedure: discuss objective topics, assign problems to solve in class. Time allowing, students will determine the molar mass of butane.
Homework: pp. 243-245, 42, 45, 46, 48, 49, 53, 54, 57, 58, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79, 80, due Friday

Friday

Objectives: students will be able to
1. Derive Graham’s Law, solve problems
2. compare real vs. ideal gases
3. review homework
Procedure: discuss objective topics, assign problems to solve in class.
Demo: molecular race.

Homework: study for a test on chapter 5, gases.

Week of October 10

Monday

No school.

Tuesday

Objectives: students will be able to

1. graphically represent relationships between pressure, volume and temperature of gases

2. Solve gas law problems

3. Define pressure

4. Derive an expression for pressure

Procedures

Begin chapter 5. Cover sections in Silberberg to cover objectives.

Wednesday

No school.

Thursday

Objectives: students will be able to
1. state Avogadro’s Law
2. solve problems using gas laws
3. state and use Dalton's law of partial pressures
4. derive the formula for the density of an ideal gas.
Procedure: discuss objective topics, assign problems to solve in class.
Homework: Read lab procedure for Determination of Gas Constant, R.

 

Week of October 3

Monday/Tuesday

No school

Wednesday

Finish Chapter 4. Review for a test on chapter 4.

Thursday

Gravimetric lab report due.

Friday

Test on chapter 4.

Week of September 26

Monday

Objectives: students will be able to
1. execute stoichiometric calculations involving precipitation reactions including acid-base titrations.
Procedure:Continue with chapter 4, cover related sections in Silberberg.

Tuesday

Objectives: students will be able to
1. Balance chemical equations

2. identify oxidation and reduction in redox reactions

3. balance redox reactions in acidic and basic solutions using the half-reaction method

Procedure: cover sections in Silberberg to meet objectives.

Thursday

Students will perform a lab on redox titration.

Friday

Objectives: students will be able to
1. identify products of elemental redox reactions
2. balance redox reactions in base using the half-reaction method
Procedure:
Finish redox, review for a test on chapter 4.
Homework: study for a test on chapter 4.

Week of September 19

Monday/Tuesday

Objectives: students will be able to
1. write balanced equations for reactions
2. explain the polar nature of water
3. distinguish between strong and weak electrolytes
4. recognize and classify types of reactions
5. define molarity
6. calculate molarity of a solution
7. prepare a solution of a given molarity
8. execute stoichiometric calculations involving precipitation reactions
Procedure: Start chapter 4, cover sections 4.1-4.3 and 3.5 (molarity) in Silberberg

Tuesday/Wednesday

Objectives: students will be able to
1. recognize and classify types of reactions
2. execute stoichiometric calculations involving precipitation reactions
Procedure: Start chapter 4, cover sections 4.1-4.3 and 3.5 (molarity) in Silberberg

Homework: handout from old text:5, 17 a, b, 32, 34, 36, 38, pg. 127 (chapter 3, on molarity), 93, 94, 95 due Friday.

Friday

Objectives: students will be able to
1. Quantitatively precipitate a chloride salt
2. Dry and weigh the product
3. Determine the amount of chloride in an unknown salt.
Procedure: Students will perform Experiment 8 in Nelson and Kemp, Gravimetric Analysis of a Chloride Salt.

Week of September 12

First day

Objectives: students will get into lab groups, check lab drawer inventory. Students will be able to use basic laboratory equipment and work safely in a laboratory environment.
Procedure: review problem sheet, return and review summer assignment, discuss lab safety, assign lab groups, discuss lab reports, lab policy, expectations. Go over Lab Book/Report policy. Students will perform lab exercise #1, Basic Laboratory Equipment
Homework: write up lab, due next Tuesday.

Second day

Objective: students will be able to
1. calculate the number of atoms, moles in a sample

2. calculate molar mass, percent composition

3. find empirical and molecular formula

4. solve stoichiometry problems

5. balance equations

6. calculate masses of reactants, products

Third day

Quiz on chapters 1-3.

 

Week of September 5, 2016

Monday Labor Day, no school

Wednesday
Objective: students will be able to
1. state course goals and expectations
2. observe several chemical changes in a test tube
3. state the scientific method, discuss the role of the chemist in society.
Procedure:
1. Take roll, assign seats, give overview of the course, including goals and expectations. Distribute course outline, rules, department safety and conduct rules.
2. Review the scientific method
3. Conduct a chemistry experiment. Students will add a common iron nail to copper sulfate solution. The students will observe changes in the test tube.
4. Confirm book distribution.
Homework: Read course outline, obtain notebooks.

Thursday
Objectives: students will be able to
1. report answers to the correct number of significant figures
2. solve problems with focus on units and conversion factors
Procedures:
1. complete chemistry experiment (iron in copper sulfate)
2. begin chapter one, chemical foundations. Go over chapter one summer assignment.
3. Hand out follow-up exercises, to be completed in class, or for homework.

Friday

Objectives: students will be able to
1. report answers to the correct number of significant figures

2. solve problems with focus on units and conversion factors

3. examples: temperature conversion and density

4. discuss the early history of science, state the contributions of Dalton, Thompson, Rutherford.
Procedures:
1. Continue with chapter one, chemical foundations. Go over chapter two summer assignment.

2. Hand out follow-up exercises, to be completed in class, or for homework.

Homework: The procedure for Experiment 1, Basic Laboratory Equipment, will be distributed so that students may read it and include the procedure in their lab books.